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Minimally Invasive Total Hip Replacement

Minimally Invasive Total Hip Replacement

A minimally invasive approach to a total hip replacement is performed through a 4inch incision rather than the single 10-12 inch incision as in the traditional approach. While the approach is modified to have less soft tissue disruption and a smaller incision, traditional implants are still used with the assistance of modified instruments.

Direct Anterior Total Hip Replacement

Anterior Hip Replacement

An anterior total hip replacement is a minimally invasive approach to a hip replacement that is performed through a 4inch incision over the front of the thigh. This approach is considered “intermuscular” meaning that the muscles overlying the hip joint are moved out of the way to enable the surgeon access to the hip capsule. With the traditional posterior or lateral approach to a hip replacement, muscles and tendons are actually split to perform the surgery, which can contribute to a limp post operatively.

Computer Navigated Total Hip Replacement

Computer Navigated Total Hip Replacement

For a successful total hip replacement, accurate positioning of the implants is crucial to accomplish the best clinical outcome with the highest implant longevity. Computer-navigation is a broad term used to describe a variety of ways of utilizing advanced technology to provide more accurate positioning of an implant. Hip replacement through computer navigation provides information and guidance to the surgeon for precise positioning of implants.

Hip Fracture Surgery

Hip Fracture Surgery

Hip fractures involve a break that occurs near the hip in the upper part of the femur or thigh bone. The thigh bone has two bony processes on the upper part - the greater and lesser trochanters. The lesser trochanter projects from the base of the femoral neck on the back of the thigh bone. Hip fractures can occur either due to a break in the femoral neck, in the area between the greater and lesser trochanter or below the lesser trochanter.

  • The Ortho Answer
  • American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
  • American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons
  • International Congress for Joint Reconstruction
  • Auburn University
  • The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston
  • Emory University - Leading Research University in Atlanta GA
  • New York University
  • Insall Scott Kelly Institute for Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine